Music Monday: Springtime Anthems from Kate Bush, Haim, and Crime Mob

The songs our editors are currently obsessing over.

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What our deputy editor Laia Garcia is listening to:

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It's strange to me how I often I forget how much I love Kate Bush. Like yes, I love "Running Up That Hill" and "Cloudbusting," which are probably some of her most known songs; and then I play the whole album, Hounds of Love, and realize I know and love every single track. It's sorcery. What I am thankful for is that it allows me to listen to this record almost as if it's the first time every time I listen to it (which has been every morning for the past two months). Lately, "Hounds of Love" has been the song that I find myself listening to on repeat. From the beginning ("It's in the trees! It's coming!") to the arresting sounds throughout, and with Kate singing, "Take my shoes off and THRRRRROW them in a lake!" — it's just really what my heart needs right now.

What our assistant editor Molly Elizalde is listening to:

There's nothing like a good slow build and Haim's new single "Right Now" does it in the most perfect way. Danielle Haim's raw vocals ("Gave you my love, you gave me nothing/Said what I gave wasn't enough") and an airy beat mount to pounding drums and determined lyrics ("Finally on the other side now/And I could see for miles/And I've forgotten every line"). Bonus: the dreamy, single-take video directed by Paul Thomas Anderson — it's almost suspenseful.

What our contributing writer Kaitlyn Greenidge is listening to:

"Circles" by Crime Mob is built on a sample of the devastating late 60s soul song "Going in Circles" by Friends of Distinction, but it builds on that with a deeply felt beat and Diamond and Princess's verses, which insist on emotional honesty and romantic intensity. This song is the perfect accompaniment to romantic confusion, mimicking the skipping audio of a scratched CD to get at the elliptical feeling of an emotional breakdown.

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